ACDC 2021 – Final delivery

My last post described the ACDC hackathon and what it’s all about, but this post is what our company ended up delivering for the Arctic Cloud Developer Challenge after 2 1/2 days of pure geeking 💪

Meet the Team

Area: Microsoft 365, SharePoint, Developer, Power Apps

Areas: Dynamics 365, Power Apps, Developer,

Areas: Microsoft 365, Azure, Developer

Areas: Power BI, Data Platform, Power Apps

Areas: Dynamics 365, Power Apps, Power Platform

Welcome to LEGO CITY

Our idea was to create an interconnected city with bleeding edge technology for monitoring the status quo of the citizens safety. The City is built next to a mountain that recently has been showing signs of activity. Geologist say that it could blow at any time. Luckily the city has invested heavily in technology that could help them save lives ❤

The city has a train track surrounding a lake. The Train track is crucial for transporting the LEGO’s around, and providing transportation for factories producing parts. In the city you have a Mayor’s office, LEGO factory, houses, and THE MOUNTAIN OF DOOM!! 🔥 Based on this drawing, or mission was to create the technology needed to make the city a safe place to live.

On the day of the event we started building right away, and this is what we created within a few hours😅

But since this is a technical blog, I will get into the makings of the Connected Lego City details, that made this project on of the coolest city concepts I have seen in a while!

The technology

Mountain of DOOM!!🔥

Let’s start at the top near the mountain. We placed 2 IOT sensors for monitoring temperature, and movement. We used the Azure IOT dev kit sensors for this purpose. Both IOT sensors were pushing data to Azure IOT hub, and then over to Stream Analytics. The constant changes were reported to the Majors office. The impressive part here was

Train Track Switch

On the top left we connected an Arduino device with a servo Switch connected. This was used to change the train track from long track, to short track.

By sending a boolean to the device, it would mechanically change the trains direction. You can barely see the device hidden beneath the track with a wire for power under the blue “water”. To see it in action, just watch the video on top.

Majors Office – Command Central

In the bottom left we had the majors office (aka command central), where the major could minor all thigs happening in his city. This is where we were looking at the output from the city sensors, and reporting via Stream Analytics to Power BI.

We included Dynamcis 365 information on the left to give a status on all ongoing city work orders (fixing problems), and on the right side we had live data from the mountain. One of the charts were showing the constant temperature, and others were measuring movement. Below we connected to the Norwegian weather API, so that we could understand what potential conditions would effect our emergency response the next days.

Train conductor – remote worker

During these Corona times we wanted to give the Train Conductor the possibility to work from home. Therefore we mounted a camera on the train, and connected it to a Raspberry PI. The Raspberry PI was also running a piece of software that could control the USB part of the LEGO Boost. For this we combined projects from:
1: https://motion-project.github.io/motion_config.html
2: https://github.com/virantha/bricknil

We also created a webserver running the live feed of the camera with the controls. The conductor could then log in and power the train in any direction needed 🚆🚂

Citizen Self Service

When there was an issue in the City, the citizens could report this via porta to Dynamics Customer Service. We connected with The Portal Connector for this scenario.

Submitting the case would deliver the case to Dynamics 365 Customer Service, where we used a few PCF components from pcf.gallery for picture rendering in CRM.

LEGO Factory – Field Service

Once the case had been evaluated, we would create a work order for booking our trusted technician for the job. For this case we used Field Service OOTB, and the technician would used the new mobile app for service delivery. We also connected the warehouse for picking parts from the factory based on the initial pictures that the technician would have seen.

Payment – Vipps

The technician fixed the broken houses, he would then send an invoice via the Norwegian payment service Vipps. The awesome thing about this was that it was all done by using a Power Automate Flow for the job! Once the Work Order was complete, we simply created a payment for the Vipps API, and received our money.

Crisis team

If the IOT sensors detected crisis, they would start a flow that the mayor would have to approve.

From this flow we would also trigger sending of SMS notification to the citizens that were in dataverse.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s